NHL Draft Profile: Peyton Krebs

Krebs is a hard-nosed competitor who has a nose for points. The shifty forward mixes a high top-speed with the ability to stop-and-start like an NFL wide receiver. Krebs ability to get to top speed is a tool that helps him blow by defenders with ease and then change direction to open up space for him to make a play to his teammates. He produced at a high rate for a weak, underpowered Kootenay Ice team.

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Name: Peyton Krebs

Date of Birth: January 26, 2001

Nationality (Place of Birth): Canadian (Okotoks, AB, Canada)

Hieght: 5’11”

Weight: 181lbs

Shoots: Left

Position: C/LW

Ranking

Ranked #9 by TSN/McKenzie

Scouting Report

The above spider graph, courtesy of Kyle Pereira of Puck77, displays the available data from Will Scouch. As shown, Krebs’ INV% (involvement percentage gauges how involved a player is on goals by a team) is among the best in his peer group. The one galring weakness in the graoh above is Krebs goals for percentage (GF%). As a playmaker primarily, Krebs isn’t a huge goal scorer despite showing the tools to add it to his game. The interesting thing is that his GF% Relative to his teammates is actually the best of the group. This would imply that although Krebs doesn’t score a large quantity of goals, he is still a driving force on his team in that department which is a primary factor is Krebs having to carry the Ice throughout the season. 

Peyton Krebs is an outstanding skater. The play-making pivot is great at taking creative paths through the neutral and offensive zones, finding space between defenders. Krebs, one of the highest-motor players in the draft, is like a dog on a bone when the puck isn’t on his stick. His ability to shift his weight and change direction at a moments notice makes him incredibly difficult to defend one-on-one. His edge work in all three areas of the ice is excellent. His ability to change the pace of play, whether slowing it down or speeding it up, makes him difficult to read in translation. In the video below, the Canadian captain does a good job establishing position in front of the net. Once there, Krebs hold his ground and does a good job of getting his stick on the shot a tipping the go ahead goal.  

Tweet coutesy of @TSN_Sports

In the defensive end, he is a hard worker and a player who makes an effort to be in position to break up passes. Krebs isn’t bad in his own end of the ice, but his positioning can lose some lustre when hemmed into the defensive zone. He seems to get over-eager to get the puck back and, at times, gets running around a bit. His active stick does a good job at interrupting passing plays. He uses his advanced hockey-IQ to read a play, react and make the smart play most of the time. He is excellent at picking up a loose puck, turning up the ice and start a break out. His strong skating, rapid acceleration due to a great first stride and his ability to shift from left to right and stay balanced with the puck allows him to break the puck out with ease and efficiency.

When entering the offensive zone, he rarely does the expected, often taking a unique path to wherever he wants to go on the ice. His vision allows him to pass the puck at any moment, often making passes to dangerous areas from positions where he doesn’t have a scoring chance. He works extremely well from the half-wall and behind the net. These positions allow Krebs to see the ice and make the appropriate play. An adept passer, the slightly undersized pivot is excellent and putting saucer passes on the tape of teammates.

Krebs is a playmaker at heart but he does possess a quick release on his wrist shot. He often backs defenders off with his speed and then uses them as a screen. His wrist shot is hard and accurate but his slap shot and one-timer could use some work. The expectation is that they will both improve with physical maturity. In the video below, Krebs recovers the puck in the defensive zone behind his own net. He builds speed through the defensive zone and passes the puck off the the wall in the neutral zone. Receiving a return pass, Krebs burst of speed backs the defender off until Krebs passes right by him getting an excellent chance on net. 

Tweet courtesy of @AthaniouLater

Preseason Outlook

Heading into the season as the top scoring WHL rookie from the year prior, Krebs was making the transition from the left wing to center. His 54 points in 67 games were impressive and he displayed his playmaking ability with 37 assists in his freshman season. As the top pick in the 2016 WHL draft, Krebs is the centrepiece of the Kootenay Ice (Winnipeg Ice starting next season). Although the team has struggled, Krebs was able to produce at a good rate without much help around him.

Prior to this season, Krebs competed for Canada at the Hlinka-Gretzky U18 tournament. There he displayed good quickness and excellent vision. He finished the tournament with five points in five games. Krebs could have easily had many more points as he was a set-up machine throughout the tournament and the recipients often missed open nets or fired the puck into the goalies chest. The excellent video below from Hockey Prospect Center shows many of the chances that Krebs generated throughout the tournament.

https://youtu.be/3HYz8jtiXA4

Carrying Kootenay, Receiving the “C”

Understanding that the season in Kootenay would be a trying one, Peyton Krebs did a good job at staying engaged in the season. His play this year never lacked effort or passion. Krebs pushed himself to continue to improve in all areas of the ice. Defensively he began to compete harder and was relentless at fighting for the puck. The ultra-competitive Krebs began the season producing at a point-per-game clip. This production, along with his constant drive to develop in all areas of the game, led the Ice to name the Okotoks, Alberta native the captain of the team. The leadership role was embraced by Krebs. The clear best player on a team that was struggling was also the hardest worker. Krebs was always the player for the Ice that pushed that extra gear to keep the team competitive in games throughout the year.

In the video below, Krebs does an excellent job driving to the net in control. Once in front, he does an excellent job establishing position by battling with a bigger defender. Winning the net front shoving match, Krebs was able to find the puck and get it to the back of the net. This showed off the fiery and competitive nature of the young Canadian center who proved throughout the season that he can play bigger than his physical make-up would suggest.

Tweet courtesy of @DraftAnalyst

Heading into the new year, Krebs had 43 points in 39 games. Krebs continued to produce on the struggling team. Without much help around him, Krebs continued to carry the Ice to the little success the team had. The team was often blown out and the losses piled up, picking up their 10th win of the season on January 16th. Finishing near the bottom of the WHL, Kootenay found their new captain but the dismal performance would lead to bigger picture changes for the Ice.

Kootenay Chapter Ends, Captain Canada Begins

The Ice were on the move to Winnipeg. A late January announcement confirmed the rumours and the final stages of the season were trying after the announcement. Winning only three of the final 18 games, the Ice closed out their final season in Kootenay in disappointing fashion. Despite the competitive drive and offensive production from Krebs, Kootenay‘s team was on its way to the Manitoba capital.

After Krebs season, knowing the next one would be spent in a different city, he turned his attention to national glory. Making the Canadian U18 team Krebs impressed in pre-tournament play, being named captain of a team for the second time in five months. Finishing as the tied for top Canadian scorer and fifth in the tournament with teammate Alex Newhook, with 10 points in just seven games.

Video courtesy of Puck Progidy Youtube channel

The Canadian team had a strong roster on paper but failed to gel. The chemistry never materialized and the skill carried them to the bronze medal game against the rival Americans. The stacked US team surprisingly lost to Russia in the semi-finals and took out their frustrations on Canada. Despite the game finishing 5-2, the game never get close for the Canadian squad. Krebs led the Canadians to a fourth place finish, losing the bronze medal game to another underachiever in the Americans.

What the Detractors Say

As with any prospect, there are weak spots in Krebs game and like many, one of them is size. At 5’11” and 181lbs, the Winnipeg Ice forward is stalky but could help himself with a good summer or two in the weight room. Bulking up a little bit by putting on good muscle mass will allow him to continue to play his game at the next level. His tenacious attitude and relentless style of play demands a lot of him physically, doing so against men will be even more difficult. Adding some size will aid him in that endeavor.

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The most glaring weakness in the young prospects arsenal is his lack of dynamic scoring ability. He has yet to hit 20 goals in the WHL, despite putting up 68 points this season. He has all the tools to get himself into position to score, his finishing ability isn’t terrible and he has an accurate shot. Krebs issue is that he often looks off shots and passes the puck. He could look to be more selfish in the future, allowing himself to score more goals to supplement his playmaking ability. Krebs biggest asset is his vision and ability to play off the rush using his speed, he will need to rely on both to create chances for himself by being more self reliant.

Peyton Krebs will be taken…

In the 8-12 range. Krebs is one of the players that sit near the back end of the second tier. He has tools that entice, but players ahead of him have a more complete set of tools. Krebs is really hurt in his lack of goal scoring. He was a play driver for Kootenay and created a lot more chances than they could have expected with the limited cast around him however his tendency to pass up on scoring opportunities to create for his teammates and a tendency to hold onto the puck for a bit too long can get him into trouble. Despite his flaws, Krebs will have a good shot at sticking in the middle come his NHL time because

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All stats and information provided by Elite ProspectsDobber Prospects and NHL.com

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